Patient Education

Key West Surgical Group would like to be your partner in health care. Feel free to ask your questions and share your concerns with us. We will work with you to develop a wellness program for the care and treatment you need.

We welcome you to our practice and look forward to caring for you.

Key West Surgical Group provides a full range of medical services including the following:

Abscess Drainage

An abscess is a mass caused by a bacterial infection. While abscesses can occur anywhere on the body, especially in a region where surgery has recently been performed, they often occur in moist areas such as the armpits, groin, tailbone region (pilonidal cysts), or mouth (dental abscesses). An abscess is formed when the cavity fills with pus, a combination of dead tissue, white blood cells, and bacteria. Although some abscesses drain on their own, many require medical intervention in the form of drainage. ...


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Appendectomy

An appendectomy is a surgical procedure to remove the appendix, a small organ located at the junction of the small intestine and colon. The appendix, once thought to be only vestigial, is now known to help lubricate the colon and to assist the immune system. Appendectomies are, therefore, performed only when necessary. ...


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Bariatric Surgery

Bariatric surgery is a surgical treatment for patients who are seriously obese or obese with another dangerous medical condition. There are several types of bariatric surgery, each of which makes surgical changes to the stomach and digestive tract which limit how much food can be ingested and how much nutrition can be absorbed. All types of bariatric surgery are performed to promote weight loss. ...


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Biopsy of Skin Lesions

A skin lesion biopsy is a diagnostic test that involves removing a tissue sample and examining it under a microscope. This test is used to identify suspicious lesions and to differentiate normal cells from abnormal ones.

Reasons for Skin Lesion Biopsies

Skin lesion biopsies are performed when simple visual examination by the physician is insufficient to make a clearcut diagnosis. Such biopsies are done in order to make a definitive diagnosis of: ...


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Breast Biopsy

A biopsy is a minimally invasive procedure that removes a sample of abnormal tissue to determine whether it is benign or malignant. A biopsy can be performed on many different areas of the body, but is commonly used to diagnose, and sometimes treat, lumps found in breast tissue.

A breast biopsy may be performed after abnormalities have been detected during a self-exam, or after a mammogram or other imaging test has been performed. Other than surgical biopsy, there are several different types of biopsies available for removing abnormal tissue. Many of these procedures are performed with ultrasound or MRI guidance to ensure precise needle placement and minimal damage to surrounding healthy tissue. ...


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Breast Cancer Screening

Breast cancer affects a significant number of women each year. It is the second-most-common cancer, and the second-leading cause of cancer death, among women. Most breast cancers are slow-growing, but there are types that are aggressive, which is why early detection is essential. Regular screenings are the best way to detect breast cancer in its early stages. The most common screenings are mammograms and doctor-performed clinical breast exams. ...


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Breast Self-Exam

Breast cancer affects a significant number of women each year. Most breast cancers are slow-growing, but there are types that are aggressive, which is why early detection is essential. Regular screenings are the best way to detect breast cancer in its early stages. The most common recommended screenings are mammograms and doctor-performed clinical breast exams. ...


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Cholecystectomy

Cholecystectomy is a surgical removal of the gallbladder, a small organ located under the liver. The gallbladder is responsible for collecting and releasing bile, a fluid that is used in the digestion of food and produced by the liver. A cholecystectomy is usually performed when the gallbladder is not functioning normally or if gallstones are present, causing distress to the patient. ...


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Colonoscopy

A colonoscopy is a diagnostic procedure performed to examine the inner lining of the colon, or large intestine, and the rectum. The colonoscopy procedure is performed routinely in patients over the age of 50 as a means detecting colorectal cancer in its early stages. It is also employed diagnostically to help determine the cause of abnormal bowel activity, abdominal pain or rectal bleeding. During a colonoscopy, tissue samples may be collected for a biopsy, and polyps or other abnormal growths may be removed. ...


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Colonoscopy FAQs

What is a colonoscopy?

A colonoscopy is a diagnostic procedure performed to examine the inside of the colon and rectum.

Why is a colonoscopy performed?

The colonoscopy procedure can aid in determining the cause of changes in bowel activity, abdominal pain, rectal bleeding, as well as detect early signs of cancer. A colonoscopy may be recommended as an option for people who are at risk of developing cancer of the colon and rectum, known as colorectal cancer, or CRC. ...


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Colon Polyps

A colon polyp is a cluster of cells that form on the lining of the colon or rectum. Some colon polyps are not cancerous and the result of abnormal cell growth, but some colon polyps may either be cancerous or become cancerous. A regular colon screening can remove any existing polyps.

Risk Factors for Developing Colon Polyps

Certain factors may put a person at a higher risk for developing polyps of the colon. Some of these factors include the following: ...


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Colon Resection

A colon resection, or colectomy, is a surgical procedure to remove either part, or all, of the large intestine (colon). This procedure is performed to repair a congenital abnormality or damage caused by a disease condition, a traumatic injury or a severe infection. A colon resection may be performed as an open procedure or laparoscopically. Wherever possible, the laparoscopic procedure is preferred since it results in smaller incisions, fewer complications, and a shorter recovery period. Normally, during a colon resection, after the diseased portions of the colon are removed, the healthy ends of the colon are reattached to one another with sutures. In more serious cases, however, a colostomy may be necessary, either temporarily or permanently. ...


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Colon Resection FAQs

What is a colon resection?

A colon resection is a surgical procedure to remove either part of or all of colon, or large intestine. When the whole colon is removed, the operation is also known as a colectomy. A colon resection is performed to treat or prevent the spread of certain diseases of the colon. ...


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Colostomy

A colostomy is a surgical procedure performed to attach one end of the large intestine to an opening in the abdominal wall (a stoma) through which body waste drains into a bag designed for the purpose. This operation is performed when a section of the colon has to be removed due to illness, infection or injury in order to give the remaining portion of the colon a chance to heal. The procedure may be performed as a temporary measure until healing takes place, or may be a permanent solution, especially when the rectum has also been removed. ...


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Da Vinci® Surgical System

In a relatively new approach to minimally invasive surgery (MIS), the da Vinci® system applies robotic technology to various types of surgery. Although laparoscopic surgery is also minimally invasive, it limits the surgeon to rigid and fairly restricted movements. The da Vinci surgical system offers flexibility and control, and permits precise, effective results in a wide range of surgical procedures, including those used in treating cardiac, colorectal, gynecologic, head and neck, thoracic, and urological problems. ...


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Debridement

Debridement is the removal of dead, devitalized or contaminated tissue from ulcers, burns and other wounds. By helping to reduce the number of toxins, microbes and other substances in a wound, debridement promotes healing and reduces the risk of infection. In conjunction with other methods, debridement is considered an essential component in the treatment of chronic (nonhealing) wounds. ...


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Diverticulitis

Diverticulitis is the inflammation of the diverticula, small pouches found in the inner lining of the intestinal tract. Diverticulosis, the condition that causes the pouches to form, is common in people over the age of 40. Nearly half the people in the United States develop diverticulosis by the age of 60. Diverticula, which are multiple small pouches, can occur anywhere along the digestive tract, but are most commonly found in the lower portion of the large intestine, the sigmoid colon. Most often, these pouches are not troublesome, but when they become infected and inflamed, the resulting condition is known as diverticulitis. ...


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Esophagogastroduodenoscopy

An esophagogastroduodenoscopy, also known as an EGD or upper endoscopy, is a diagnostic procedure that examines and treats certain conditions of the upper gastrointestinal tract, which includes the esophagus, stomach and upper part of the small intestine, with an endoscope. An EGD is able to aid in the diagnosis of conditions affecting the upper digestive tract issues, including nausea, vomiting, heartburn, abdominal pain and ulcers. During the EGD procedure, tissue samples can be obtained for biopsy, objects can be removed and therapeutic procedures may be performed. ...


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Gastrectomy

A gastrectomy is the surgical removal of part or all of the stomach. When part or all of the stomach is removed, a gastric resection is necessary to reconnect the gastrointestinal tract so that digestion may continue to occur as normally as possible.

Candidates for a Gastrectomy

Candidates for a gastrectomy and gastric resection may include patients with the following medical conditions: ...


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Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), also known as acid reflux, occurs when stomach acid, used for digestion, regurgitates or refluxes into the esophagus, causing inflammation and damage to the lining of the esophagus. GERD is a complication of gastroesophageal reflux, also known as GER, a less serious form of GERD. Most people have occasional episodes of GER, but when GER becomes more frequent, occurring more than two times a week, it is classified as GERD. The stomach acid causes pain or burning in the chest or throat, known as heartburn. ...


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Hemorrhoids

Hemorrhoids are swollen veins in the anal canal. In their normal state, these veins provide cushioning during bowel movements. They can, however, swell after lifting, straining, constipation, passing of hard stools or diarrhea, or pregnancy. Hemorrhoids are not life-threatening, but they can be painful. If swelling persists, the veins may become permanently stretched (prolapsed). ...


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Hernia

A hernia occurs when an abdominal organ, usually the small intestine, protrudes through the abdominal wall. The protruding tissue may become obstructed or incarcerated, or may strangulate. In the latter case, blood flow to the tissue is impeded and the results may be life-threatening. Hernias do not heal on their own and may be uncomfortable or painful. Surgery is the only method to correct them. Small hiatal hernias, however, can sometimes be kept at bay through diet and medication. Among the most common procedures in the United States, hernia surgery is performed to push the protruding tissue back into place and repair the weakness in the abdominal wall which allowed it to pass through. ...


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Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

Cholecystectomy is the surgical removal of the gallbladder, a small organ located under the liver. The gallbladder collects and releases bile to aid in the process of digestion. Although the gallbladder performs a digestive function, it is not necessary for proper body functioning and may be removed if diseased. ...


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Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair

A laparoscopic ventral hernia repair is an operation performed to repair a ventral, or abdominal, hernia through a minimally invasive procedure. When performed laparoscopically, this surgery has advantages over traditional surgery, including: less scarring, less pain, less risk of infection, and a shorter recovery period. A ventral or abdominal hernia occurs when there is a weakness in the abdominal wall which develops a tear or hole. The hernia is created as the inner lining of the abdomen pushes through the opening, forming a sac into which a portion of abdominal or intestinal tissue protrudes. A ventral hernia appears as a bulge on the outer wall of the abdomen. Ventral hernias vary in severity and may or may not require surgical repair. ...


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Laparoscopy

Laparoscopy is a minimally invasive surgical procedure used to diagnose and treat conditions in the abdominal and pelvic areas. During a laparoscopic procedure, a thin tube with a camera on the end, known as a laparoscope, is inserted through a tiny incision to allow the doctor to closely examine the organs of the area. Surgical instruments can be inserted through additional incisions to treat any identified problems or to retrieve tissue specimens. ...


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Mastectomy

A mastectomy is a surgical procedure to remove the breast(s) in a patient with breast cancer. It is one of the most commonly used and effective options for treating breast cancer because it removes all traces of cancer, and reduces the risk of its recurrence.

Types of Mastectomy

There are several different mastectomy procedures designed to eradicate the cancer but retain as much of the natural breast as possible. Some of the most commonly used techniques include: ...


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Pilonidal Cyst Removal

A pilonidal cyst is a fluid-filled sac like a pimple at the coccyx, or tailbone, just below the crack of the buttocks. Pilonidal cysts are prone to infection. If one becomes infected, filling with pus, it is technically called a pilonidal abscess. Pilonidal cysts are always treated through excision and drainage. It is important to treat these cysts because left untreated the infection may become systemic. ...


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Thyroid Biopsy

During a thyroid biopsy, a small tissue sample is taken from the thyroid, a butterfly-shaped gland in the neck that helps regulate the body's metabolism, heart rate, blood pressure and temperature.

If a lump is detected after a thyroid sonogram, a doctor may choose to perform a biopsy to determine whether the nodule is malignant. A biopsy may also be recommended if the thyroid gland is enlarged without explanation. ...


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Thyroidectomy

 

Thyroidectomy is the surgical removal of part or all of the thyroid lobes. Overactive thyroid hormone production, known as hyperthyroidism, is a common condition that causes an increase in metabolic function throughout the body. An overactive thyroid is often caused by an adenoma, which causes the thyroid gland to enlarge. If left untreated, this condition can lead to kidney problems or extreme stress on vital organs. ...


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Upper Endoscopy

Upper endoscopy, also known as esophagogastroduodenoscopy or EGD, is a diagnostic procedure used to visually examine and diagnose conditions of the upper gastrointestinal, or digestive tract. The upper gastrointestinal tract includes the esophagus, stomach and duodenum, or upper part of the small intestine. An upper endoscopy is performed using a flexible tube with an attached light and camera, called an endoscope. It is inserted through the mouth and guided along to thoroughly examine the upper gastrointestinal tract. ...


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Endovenous Radiofrequency Ablation

Endovenous radiofrequency ablation is a minimally invasive alternative to vein stripping for the treatment of varicose veins. Varicose veins are veins in which the valves are damaged to the point that there is a backflow of blood, called venous reflux. Venous reflux interferes with efficient circulation and causes blood to pool in the affected veins and cause distention. ...


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Venous Interventions

Venous interventions are minimally invasive treatment options for patients with blocked or narrowed veins. These treatments are designed to either open up or seal off the diseased veins in order to prevent serious complications or permanent damage, while avoiding the need for surgery. ...


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